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Mikael Eriksson Björling

Things that matters! About digital transformation, design, culture and lifestyle in the Networked Society

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Working Life

Future Summit i Norrköping

Jag har rest runt och pratat på många konferenser, både stora och små runt om i världen. En av det roligaste och trevligaste jag varit på är Future Summit i Norrköping tidigare i höst. Vi talare fick tid att umgås och träffas redan dagen innan själva konferensen, där vi fick vara med om en resa ut i rymden i visualiseringscenter, vi besökte det fantastiska lilla biblioteket och observatoriet i De Geer Gymnasiet och vi fick en fin stadsvandring. Det hela avslutades med middag tillsammans med stad och näringsliv.fs_nkpg 16IMG_0170 2

När vi sedan stod på scenen under konferensen kände vi redan varandra och kunde leverera bra innehåll och interagera i varandras paneldiskussioner.

När vi gick till tåget, dagen efter konferensen fanns vi på förstasidan i NT!

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Systemet och miljön

Wind, en prisbelönt kortfilm om hur levande system påverkas av sin miljö och hur det måste ändras när miljön ändras. Arbetslivet (ett levande system) påverkas i högsta grad av sin miljö (samhällsstruktur, marknad, ekonomi, etc.) Detta är en utmaning för de flesta när vi nu lämnar industrialismens miljö till det uppkopplade samhällets miljö.

Mer animeringar av Robert Loebel hittar ni på http://www.robertloebel.com/

 

Say hello to the era of social business

post-1-siembraviva-768x373In our brand new report, The Social Business Era: Creating Impact and Influencing Change, we explore a new model for 2017 and beyond: The Social Business. This is a new type of company on the market that is out to challenge traditional ways of doing businesses.

The majority of companies operating today use profit as their main measurement, i.e. the business is judged by others (the market) with economic figures and the potential for growth. But things are changing.

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It is no coincidence that social businesses have recently emerged and developed in the Networked Society. But why is this happening now?

  1. The ultra-capitalistic industrial society of the late 20th Century is now being questioned as a relevant model for a ‘good world’. At the same time, the state and traditional social institutions that are supposed to care for the welfare of citizens are failing people across the world.
  2. New generations growing up with mobility, broadband, and internet access are now entering the arena of social issues. They are also used to things moving quickly, getting things done right away, and seeing direct impact. They experience frustration with old ways of doing things and the slowness and inefficiencies of institutions to accomplish any real change.
  3. The necessary technology is already in place. Today, we have technology platforms, digital tools, and social networks available for free or at a low cost, which makes it possible for people to start something without the need for large investments or technological skills.

How do we define The Social Business?

  1. No dividends allowed. “A non-dividend company that is created to address and solve a social problem”.
  2. Focus on intent and output: “An organization formed by one or more people whose commercial activities are primarily driven by the desire to create positive social change”.
  3. A broad, pragmatic approach: “A business whose primary intent is to create social impact and that uses revenue streams to become financially sustainable in order to further that impact”.

Create positive impact…who wouldn’t want to do that?

In my next post for the Networked Society blog, I will take a look at the main differences between traditional and social businesses.

Read more about this report at Ericsson Networked Society site

Related: The Social Business Era: Creating Impact and Influencing Change

 

Central sites or local hubs – reflections on future city offices

As mobile technologies continue to liberate us from specific locations and time restrictions, it becomes less important where, when and how work is done. This ultimately will change how people moving around in cities. Some will work from home,others will go to the office and still others may prefer to sit at a café. Telecommuting and distance working will increase but this does not mean that people will only work from their homes (although some will). We still need a social context to our day and this means that we will want to meet people and get stimulated.

Read the full post at the Networked Society blog >>>

The office is dead – long live the exchange place!

The office space is changing and I don’t thing we understand the impact of that change. It will change how we organize work. I have a new post on the topic at the Networked Society blog >>>

Working life as we know it is changing dramatically

A few days ago I wrote a new post on how working life is changing as we enter the Networked Society and eight areas that we will see more of at work. Read the post at the Networked Society blog >>>

Senaste tiden…

Den senaste tiden har det varit presentationer och mediaövningar i Moskva och Stockholm kring Networked Society och hur arbetslivet förändras.

Open Innovation – Moscow  1/11 paneldiskussion om “Smart devices and portable gadgets: How the Internet of things is changing the world” med en riktigt bra sammansättning i panelen: Ralph Simon modererade och vi som samtalade var Qaizar Hassonjee, Vice President Innovations, Wearable Sports Electronics, Adidas, Eugeny Kuznetsov, Director, Strategic Communications Department, RVC, Vladislav Martynov, General Director, Yota Devices, Sonny Vu, Founder, Misfit Wearables, Dmitry Kuznetsov, Country Marketing Director—Russia, Google och Ruslan Smelyanskiy, R&D Director, Applied Research Center for Computer Networks.

MEB-open-Innovation-2013

Mobile Future – Stockholm 7/11

Keynote presentation om “framtidens arbetsliv”. Hur förändras vårt arbetsliv när vi går in i det uppkopplade samhället, hur förändras vår syn på arbete var ämnet för dagen? Bra publik och kul med extra support på scenen!
Mobile Future MEB och GB
Photo credit @jennalee

Artikel om presentationen hittas här: http://www.mobil.se/ericsson-om-framtidens-arbetsliv-1.527927.html

Och PPT bilderna hittas här: http://www.slideshare.net/mikaeleb/ericsson-wl-mikaeeb131107

SIME Stockholm HR Summit

Vilka utmaningar finns i nästa generations arbetsliv, hur hittar man talanger, var tar företaget slut och var börjar privatlivet? Det var frågor vi ställde oss på SIME HR Summit. Extra gott stöd på scenen även här!

SIME MEB och GB
Photo credit @bylineMiranda

Scen-intervju med Tommie Cau och samtal med Marie Larsson Hallander  http://sime.nu/conferences/stockholm/stockholm-hr-summit/speakers-hr-summit/

ATEAs kundtidning Tomorrow kom ut för ett tag sedan med en intervju från Boot camp i somras http://viewer.zmags.com/publication/e9c5d17c#/e9c5d17c/40

Skärmavbild 2013-11-30 kl. 20.27.42
Photo credit: Jonas Borg

Unga vill ha ett privatliv på jobbet

Intervju med mig i Computer Sweden om ” Unga vill ha ett privatliv på jobbet”

länk-illu

http://computersweden.idg.se/2.2683/1.506450/unga-vill-ha-ett-privatliv-pa-jobbet

It’s work, but not as we know it

Every era has historically had a main area of work or value-creating activity. Most of us think about employment and occupations as something that emerged with industrial society. During the era of “hunting and gathering,” the family, group and community were engaged in all things required in order to survive and have a decent life. These activities involved hunting, gathering food, making fire, creating clothing and so on.

As we started to cultivate the soil and grow crops, the first settlements emerged. For thousands of years, work for most of the Earth’s population involved farming-related activities associated with the season, the sun and the weather. It was hard to differentiate between what was work and what wasn’t because working hours did not exist. During the feudalist era, farmers worked about 120-150 days a year, even if some of the days could be long during harvest time.

Read the rest of the article at The Networked Society blog >>>

 

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