Search

Mikael Eriksson Björling

About people, business and culture in the Networked Society

Tag

Working Life

Are we shaping smartphones or are they shaping us?

In my last post, I wrote about two-way flexibility – about people trying to understand the new norms and rules in the changing landscape of work and leisure. In this post, I want to continue that discussion further and look into what issues arise as the private and personal spheres merge.

In his book from 1963, ‘Understanding Media’, Marshall McLuhan wrote the following: “For the message of any medium or technology is the change of scale or pace or pattern that it introduces into human affair”. He continues, “The medium is the message, because it is the medium that shape and control the scale and form of human associations and action.” 

What is the message from a smartphone and what pattern does it introduce into human affairs? That is the content of this blog post. Continue to the Networked Society Blog.

When are you out-of-office?

Right now I am sitting at the co-working space, Impact Hub in downtown Seattle preparing for a workshop I will lead tomorrow. I could of course have stayed in my hotel room but I prefer to get a flavor of the local entrepreneurial scene and be a bit social as well (beyond the borders of my computer).

My first business trip with Ericsson was in 1999 to Pittsburgh and the CHI 99 (Computer Human Interaction) conference. Back then you did not really have any connection with work or family when you were traveling. Mobile phones and the internet both existed, but were far from the experience we have today.

A modem was the most common connection until 2005 and intercontinental calls with your mobile phone were not really practical because of the cost. I don’t think I took my laptop with me as it was pretty useless without a connection. So when the conference program was over you did not have any e-mail to answer or work to keep up with. There was a clear border that ended work, defined by the technically and economically limitations.

Today those borders are gone. Wherever you are, work can be there. Continue reading at the Networked Society blog.

It’s working life, Jim, but not as we know it

I have been writing recently about the changes happening in working life and the challenges that both employers and employees will face going forward into the Networked Society.

Today’s cultural changes and technological progress are transforming working life as we know it, creating a business landscape that is dynamic and changing.

The new business landscape emerging out of these changes is a challenging one, where there are no safe positions and where anyone can be overtaken or disqualified. In this harsh new world, you have to learn to adapt to the new rules in order to survive.

What do you as an employer, manager and leader have to think about and consider in this new working environment?
How should you as an individual or employee think? What will be important going forward?
Visit the Networked Society blog and check out some survival tips and advice in a new report, “The Next Generation Working Life – A Survival Guide.”

What is defining next-generation working life?

Recently, Tonny Uhlin and I went into the studio to record the first episode of the “Next-generation Working Life” podcast. During this first episode, we talk about the big and small changes we see coming to our work places as we journey deeper into the Networked Society and how these will impact our working life going forward.

Visit the Networked Society blog and listen to the podcast , or if you like, watch the video above and then read the full report: ‘Next-generation working life – from workplace to exchange space’.

Central sites or local hubs – reflections on future city offices

As mobile technologies continue to liberate us from specific locations and time restrictions, it becomes less important where, when and how work is done. This ultimately will change how people moving around in cities. Some will work from home,others will go to the office and still others may prefer to sit at a café. Telecommuting and distance working will increase but this does not mean that people will only work from their homes (although some will). We still need a social context to our day and this means that we will want to meet people and get stimulated.

Read the full post at the Networked Society blog >>>

The office is dead – long live the exchange place!

The office space is changing and I don’t thing we understand the impact of that change. It will change how we organize work. I have a new post on the topic at the Networked Society blog >>>

Working life as we know it is changing dramatically

A few days ago I wrote a new post on how working life is changing as we enter the Networked Society and eight areas that we will see more of at work. Read the post at the Networked Society blog >>>

Senaste tiden…

Den senaste tiden har det varit presentationer och mediaövningar i Moskva och Stockholm kring Networked Society och hur arbetslivet förändras.

Open Innovation – Moscow  1/11 paneldiskussion om “Smart devices and portable gadgets: How the Internet of things is changing the world” med en riktigt bra sammansättning i panelen: Ralph Simon modererade och vi som samtalade var Qaizar Hassonjee, Vice President Innovations, Wearable Sports Electronics, Adidas, Eugeny Kuznetsov, Director, Strategic Communications Department, RVC, Vladislav Martynov, General Director, Yota Devices, Sonny Vu, Founder, Misfit Wearables, Dmitry Kuznetsov, Country Marketing Director—Russia, Google och Ruslan Smelyanskiy, R&D Director, Applied Research Center for Computer Networks.

MEB-open-Innovation-2013

Mobile Future – Stockholm 7/11

Keynote presentation om “framtidens arbetsliv”. Hur förändras vårt arbetsliv när vi går in i det uppkopplade samhället, hur förändras vår syn på arbete var ämnet för dagen? Bra publik och kul med extra support på scenen!
Mobile Future MEB och GB
Photo credit @jennalee

Artikel om presentationen hittas här: http://www.mobil.se/ericsson-om-framtidens-arbetsliv-1.527927.html

Och PPT bilderna hittas här: http://www.slideshare.net/mikaeleb/ericsson-wl-mikaeeb131107

SIME Stockholm HR Summit

Vilka utmaningar finns i nästa generations arbetsliv, hur hittar man talanger, var tar företaget slut och var börjar privatlivet? Det var frågor vi ställde oss på SIME HR Summit. Extra gott stöd på scenen även här!

SIME MEB och GB
Photo credit @bylineMiranda

Scen-intervju med Tommie Cau och samtal med Marie Larsson Hallander  http://sime.nu/conferences/stockholm/stockholm-hr-summit/speakers-hr-summit/

ATEAs kundtidning Tomorrow kom ut för ett tag sedan med en intervju från Boot camp i somras http://viewer.zmags.com/publication/e9c5d17c#/e9c5d17c/40

Skärmavbild 2013-11-30 kl. 20.27.42
Photo credit: Jonas Borg

Connected communities are driving a new do-ocracy

I wrote earlier about the game changers and how creative people no longer practice their hobbies in the private sphere but rather in networks and communities. The ‘maker culture’ is growing stronger and we see a growing ‘do-culture’ covering more and more areas in society.

Easy access to information about almost anything is fundamentally changing our possibilities to do things ourselves. For do-it-yourself (DIY) people, it is much easier to find information and much easier to link up with people who share the same interests. This, together with affordable technologies, tools and services are lowering the barriers to nearly a zero cost in many areas.

Another driving factor is that people feel the need to connect with the outcome of their work. It is hard to see the importance of creating yet another PowerPoint file when you can’t see the final result of your efforts.

How and where things are produced is also becoming important and many people have started producing and experimenting with their own productions. We have seen this in food preparation for some years now with sourdough baking, homemade sausages and advanced barbecuing as just a few examples of what people are doing.

The ‘maker culture’ is now reaching a critical mass. There are new hackerspaces starting every day with a lot of people engaging in millions of ongoing projects. All these communities are sharing information and have new sources for funding such as Kickstarter. Things that use to be really complex, and that only a couple of years ago could be done by big corporations or academic researchers, are now being done in a growing number of hackerspaces, meetups, basements, garages and lofts. Topics such as 3D printing, robotics and DNA projects are now common.

 

Read more at the Networked SOciety blog >>>

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑