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Mikael Eriksson Björling

Things that matters! About digital transformation, design, culture and lifestyle in the Networked Society

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Working Life

Connected communities are driving a new do-ocracy

I wrote earlier about the game changers and how creative people no longer practice their hobbies in the private sphere but rather in networks and communities. The ‘maker culture’ is growing stronger and we see a growing ‘do-culture’ covering more and more areas in society.

Easy access to information about almost anything is fundamentally changing our possibilities to do things ourselves. For do-it-yourself (DIY) people, it is much easier to find information and much easier to link up with people who share the same interests. This, together with affordable technologies, tools and services are lowering the barriers to nearly a zero cost in many areas.

Another driving factor is that people feel the need to connect with the outcome of their work. It is hard to see the importance of creating yet another PowerPoint file when you can’t see the final result of your efforts.

How and where things are produced is also becoming important and many people have started producing and experimenting with their own productions. We have seen this in food preparation for some years now with sourdough baking, homemade sausages and advanced barbecuing as just a few examples of what people are doing.

The ‘maker culture’ is now reaching a critical mass. There are new hackerspaces starting every day with a lot of people engaging in millions of ongoing projects. All these communities are sharing information and have new sources for funding such as Kickstarter. Things that use to be really complex, and that only a couple of years ago could be done by big corporations or academic researchers, are now being done in a growing number of hackerspaces, meetups, basements, garages and lofts. Topics such as 3D printing, robotics and DNA projects are now common.

 

Read more at the Networked SOciety blog >>>

Unga vill ha ett privatliv på jobbet

Intervju med mig i Computer Sweden om ” Unga vill ha ett privatliv på jobbet”

länk-illu

http://computersweden.idg.se/2.2683/1.506450/unga-vill-ha-ett-privatliv-pa-jobbet

It’s work, but not as we know it

Every era has historically had a main area of work or value-creating activity. Most of us think about employment and occupations as something that emerged with industrial society. During the era of “hunting and gathering,” the family, group and community were engaged in all things required in order to survive and have a decent life. These activities involved hunting, gathering food, making fire, creating clothing and so on.

As we started to cultivate the soil and grow crops, the first settlements emerged. For thousands of years, work for most of the Earth’s population involved farming-related activities associated with the season, the sun and the weather. It was hard to differentiate between what was work and what wasn’t because working hours did not exist. During the feudalist era, farmers worked about 120-150 days a year, even if some of the days could be long during harvest time.

Read the rest of the article at The Networked Society blog >>>

 

The changing nature of working life – Part I

Just like other major, historical shifts, the Networked Society will fundamentally change working life as we know it. It will change the type of business and value-creating activities we are engaged in; it will change how businesses are organized and the business development processes; it will change how we as individuals are working and the skills and knowledge we will need to acquire.

Here is an easy exercise. Ask any senior citizen you know, perhaps your grandma or grandpa, about what working life was like when they were young. Then compare that to a modern work environment and it will probably be hard for them to recognize the things we call work. Concepts like flex-time and working wherever you are will be hard for them to get their heads around. The same will be true of virtual teams that span organizations and locations as well as the blurring lines between work and private life.

A number of areas are driving this change in working life…

Read the rest of the article at The Networked Society blog >>>

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