Search

Mikael Eriksson Björling

Things that matters! About digital transformation, design, culture and lifestyle in the Networked Society

Tag

Interaction design

Adopting design thinking to embrace a changing business landscape

During the last few years many of the big traditional management consultancy companies have acquired creative and digital agencies. Why? I believe they want to ensure they have the right competence and the right toolbox to future proof their business in today’s increasingly digitally transformed business landscape.gui_design_2-90068crop013667083774resize1500844autoorientquality90stripbackground23ffffffextensionjpgid8

In my opinion, traditional management thinking will simply not be enough going forward in the new digital business landscape. The big consultancy companies have realized they need to add creativity and methodologies into their portfolios.
McKinsey, for example, has added a digital arm to its operations by acquiring VerydayLunar and Carbon 12. Accenture did the same by acquiring Fjord and Kaplan. Elsewhere, Deloitte has acquired Mobiento and Acne. These are just some examples from bigger players but there are many more examples.

How design thinking is related to business

At Ericsson, we believe that organizations need to leverage on connectivity to thrive. About five years ago, we also started to take bigger steps to develop more digital ways of working that are better suited for the business landscape of the future.

In our Future of Work report we explain how life is undergoing dramatic changes and organizations will have to rethink how they structure work. As described above, this is happening all around us – at your workplace and mine.

By creating a culture that focuses on individuals, organizations can build a reputation of being a progressive and talent friendly company.

When individuals get the opportunity to work on meaningful tasks, they embrace the organization, and they will also attract talent from their own network. Organizations that quickly learn how to manage talent will not only innovate faster than their competitors, they will also outperform them on the bottom line.

McKinsey recently published The Value of Design report in which they also conclude that “the best design performers increase their revenues and shareholder returns at nearly twice the rate of their industry counterparts.”
So, design – good design – and revenue are closely related. This means there is less space for bad design in todays connected and transparent market were users have such widespread access to all information. Back in the day, bad design had a bigger chance to survive in the analogue and physical world that no longer exists.
Good design meets the needs of the customer and user. Good design makes the complex easy to understand.

So, if we can agree that good design is a necessity in the emerging business landscape, how do you go about creating and fostering good design?
To create a good customer and user experience you need to get three areas correct. First your product or service needs to fill someone’s need for something. That’s what we call usefulness, i.e. we need to design the right product.

The next step is to design the product right, i.e. usability. Users and customers need to understand how to use and interact with your design.

The third area is brand or the aesthetics. The design has to reflect your brand and have an esthetic expression that matches the purpose of the design.

To get these three areas right there are processes that businesses can use and there are specific competences and craftmanship which they can employ – that is what the consultancy firm is paying these creative agencies for).

In future blog posts I will explore these processes, competences and what you can do to boost creativity in your business.

This blog post was originally posted on the Ericsson Blog >>>

Design from the dot com era

I developed this IP telephony concept during the autumn 2000 for Ericsson Business Corporation. The work included doing the interaction design, graphical design, prototype development and usability testing. This was three years before the first version of Skype was launched 2003. The sound quality in the application was incredible good at the time. This at a time when most people used dialup modem to access internet and hardly anyone used a wireless access. Laptops was rare, and about 90+ % of the population in the developed world still had fixed line phones at home. In Sweden at that time about 40% of the population used internet at work at least on a weekly basis.

Personal_voicePersonal_voice_expanded

Mobile phone interface design from year 2000-2001

ER380

These design sketches are from about year 2000. Mobile phone screens still had black and green screens and this is seven years before the first Apple iPhone was launched. I still have my R380 in a box together with most other phones I have used.

I did these screen designs in a project where we wanted to update the Ericsson R380 phone interface to improve the user experience. This was one of the most advanced phones on the market, combining a mobile phone and a personal assistant.

default_closed  default_open
default screen portrait and landscape mode

phoneBook_closed  phoneBook_open
Contact screen portrait and landscape mode

Users could still not install their own applications on mobile phones. 2001 we wanted to add a navigation software called Personal Navigation Tool for which I designed the interaction design and the screen design. Below you can see the flow chart of the interaction design and some of the final screen designs for the navigation application.

PNT_interaction_design

favourites01find01efind06bfind10b

 

 

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑