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Mikael Eriksson Björling

Things that matters! About digital transformation, design, creativity and lifestyle in the Networked Society

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Next Generation Working Life

Life in 2025: The Anchored

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The Anchored are the people steadily rooted in the middle class, which was once the result of the 20th century industrialization. In 2025, they are still living in the traditional industrial economic system. While they used to be employed in the manufacturing industry and related sectors, in the 21st century they have migrated increasingly to the service sector.the-anchored-588x300

A majority of the Anchored hold jobs in retail, sales functions, the catering industry, transportation, logistics, healthcare, customer service functions, and IT service functions. Some still work in the manufacturing industries and in civil servant positions, but they are significantly fewer than before due to a decreased need for traditional labor in these sectors and, in the case of government, due to significantly weaker finances.

The Anchored are the people in the Networked Society who most hold on to traditional, 20thcentury values. Due to their diminishing financial means, they are increasingly consuming only basic, automatically manufactured products in most categories, while saving up to acquire one or a few more goods loaded with material status.

The Anchored:

  • work within the traditional industrial economic system
  • value traditions and stability
  • focus on material status
  • divide life into work and leisure
  • save up to acquire a few goods loaded with material status
  • focus on affordable experiences.

Explore more about The Anchored here.

Life in 2025: The Players

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In the Networked Society of 2025, the Players are outside the economic system or have never been invited into it. They also lack the ability, skills, connections, and motivation to get back into the game, land a traditional job, or organize themselves. They do temporary jobs here and there, live off various forms of social security payments, and exchange favors with family and friends. Most of the Players have plenty of time at their disposal, and spend their time primarily on entertainment and games of various kinds. Sometimes they are pulled into different initiatives, but they rarely organize themselves.

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The Players often live under strained conditions and sometimes even struggle to take care of some of their basic needs. Many of them can’t really afford to own a home, but they tend to value their possessions greatly.

The Players spend much of their time playing in different ways. Primarily they consume easily available entertainment of all kinds: TV, movies, games, sports, social media, betting, and adult entertainment. Many of them seek out free alternatives on the market, whether legal (freemium business models) or illegal (such as pirate streaming of TV and video).

The Players:

  • operate outside the traditional labor market
  • have plenty of time
  • engage in digitally enabled entertainment
  • seek out free alternatives
  • value possessions and personal security.

Explore more about The Players here.

Life in 2025: The Resourceful

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My previous blog post was about the model you can use to understand movements in lifestyles in the Networked Society. If you missed that post you can find it here.  In this post, let’s look closer at the Resourceful.the-resourceful-588x300

The Resourceful employ the most attractive positions in society and are made up of business owners, entrepreneurs, investors, innovators, managers, leaders, information and knowledge workers, artists and creative workers, highly skilled specialists, and high-level politicians and government officials. The Resourceful have either economic, cultural, or social capital – and in many cases they have plenty of all three. They also have the ability to trade in cultural and social capital for economic capital and are, therefore, not always dependent on a traditional paycheck to carry them in their life as consumers. The Resourceful are, per capita, the strongest consumption class in the Networked Society, but as they are also the smallest group, they are primarily a force in terms of opinion leadership related to consumption.

The group spends a lot of their economic capital on consumption, but also uses their cultural and social capital to access and acquire the products, services, and consumption experiences they want. Many brands in all sorts of categories will allow them to use their products and services for free in order to reach out to other consumers through the networks of the Resourceful.

In short, the Resourceful:

  • have economic, cultural and/or social capital
  • belong to influential networks
  • seek extraordinary experiences
  • prioritize health and wellbeing
  • make conscious statements about global sustainability.

Explore more about The Resourceful here.

Life in 2025: A new model for emerging roles

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We are now sixteen years into the new millennium and we have had internet and a global standard for mobile telephony for a quarter of a century. The new millennium marks in many ways the transition from the age of industrialization to a new paradigm, which we call The Networked Society.

Now, with some distance, we are able to see the age of industrialization for what it really was. To generalize, it was an era of escalating capitalism, mass-manufacturing, mass-consumption, and a highly modernistic organization of life into clear cut categories, invented by the great institutions of the 20th century: governments and large enterprises.

During the age of industrialization the individual left her rural and collective societies, moved into cities and urban areas, separated work life from private life, made more money than ever before, increased her standard of living, and started to consume the fruits of the free markets. But how are these structures being challenged? What is happening with life and lifestyles right now? In what direction are we moving? How are values and attitudes changing? And what clusters of different lifestyles do we see emerging? These are some of the questions we explore in the Life in 2025 work. This work is based on multiple sources from the research we done the last five years (which you are welcome to explore at The Networked Society site)

On an overall level we’d argue that it’s possible to understand the new structure of society along two dimensions: inside the system vs. outside the system; that is, those that are part of established institutions, networks, and employment and those who are not. The next dimension is if you are empowered or dependent; that is, those who are active in society and strive to control their own situation and those who are dependent on other groups in society and with less control of their own situation. This gives us four macro level groups to consider: The Resourceful, The Social, The Players, and The Anchored. Into this model we also want to plot a fifth group we expect to emerge in the Networked Society, The Mobile, which gives us the following model.life-in-2025-588x300

All these groups have different life conditions, their lifestyles, values and attitudes are different. So this model is a framework for thinking and analyzing, rather than a quantified picture of the world. The size of the quadrants and how many people that will be empowered vs. dependent is very much a political and ideological question and this will be different in different countries. I hope you’ll join me over the course of my next five blogposts, as I describe the different lifestyles one by one.

Read more the the Networked Society blog >>>

Central sites or local hubs – reflections on future city offices

As mobile technologies continue to liberate us from specific locations and time restrictions, it becomes less important where, when and how work is done. This ultimately will change how people moving around in cities. Some will work from home,others will go to the office and still others may prefer to sit at a café. Telecommuting and distance working will increase but this does not mean that people will only work from their homes (although some will). We still need a social context to our day and this means that we will want to meet people and get stimulated.

Read the full post at the Networked Society blog >>>

The office is dead – long live the exchange place!

The office space is changing and I don’t thing we understand the impact of that change. It will change how we organize work. I have a new post on the topic at the Networked Society blog >>>

Working life as we know it is changing dramatically

A few days ago I wrote a new post on how working life is changing as we enter the Networked Society and eight areas that we will see more of at work. Read the post at the Networked Society blog >>>

SIME Stockholm HR Summit, Open Innovation och Mobile Future

Den senaste tiden har det varit presentationer och mediaövningar i Moskva och Stockholm kring Networked Society och hur arbetslivet förändras.

Open Innovation – Moscow  1/11 paneldiskussion om “Smart devices and portable gadgets: How the Internet of things is changing the world” med en riktigt bra sammansättning i panelen: Ralph Simon modererade och vi som samtalade var Qaizar Hassonjee, Vice President Innovations, Wearable Sports Electronics, Adidas, Eugeny Kuznetsov, Director, Strategic Communications Department, RVC, Vladislav Martynov, General Director, Yota Devices, Sonny Vu, Founder, Misfit Wearables, Dmitry Kuznetsov, Country Marketing Director—Russia, Google och Ruslan Smelyanskiy, R&D Director, Applied Research Center for Computer Networks.

MEB-open-Innovation-2013

Mobile Future – Stockholm 7/11

Keynote presentation om “framtidens arbetsliv”. Hur förändras vårt arbetsliv när vi går in i det uppkopplade samhället, hur förändras vår syn på arbete var ämnet för dagen? Bra publik och kul med extra support på scenen!
Mobile Future MEB och GB
Photo credit @jennalee

Artikel om presentationen hittas här: http://www.mobil.se/ericsson-om-framtidens-arbetsliv-1.527927.html

Och PPT bilderna hittas här: http://www.slideshare.net/mikaeleb/ericsson-wl-mikaeeb131107

SIME Stockholm HR Summit

Vilka utmaningar finns i nästa generations arbetsliv, hur hittar man talanger, var tar företaget slut och var börjar privatlivet? Det var frågor vi ställde oss på SIME HR Summit. Extra gott stöd på scenen även här!

SIME MEB och GB
Photo credit @bylineMiranda

Scen-intervju med Tommie Cau och samtal med Marie Larsson Hallander  http://sime.nu/conferences/stockholm/stockholm-hr-summit/speakers-hr-summit/

ATEAs kundtidning Tomorrow kom ut för ett tag sedan med en intervju från Boot camp i somras http://viewer.zmags.com/publication/e9c5d17c#/e9c5d17c/40

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Photo credit: Jonas Borg

Unga vill ha ett privatliv på jobbet

Intervju med mig i Computer Sweden om ” Unga vill ha ett privatliv på jobbet”

länk-illu

http://computersweden.idg.se/2.2683/1.506450/unga-vill-ha-ett-privatliv-pa-jobbet

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