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Mikael Eriksson Björling

Things that matters! About digital transformation, design, culture and lifestyle in the Networked Society

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Work

Systemet och miljön

Wind, en prisbelönt kortfilm om hur levande system påverkas av sin miljö och hur det måste ändras när miljön ändras. Arbetslivet (ett levande system) påverkas i högsta grad av sin miljö (samhällsstruktur, marknad, ekonomi, etc.) Detta är en utmaning för de flesta när vi nu lämnar industrialismens miljö till det uppkopplade samhällets miljö.

Mer animeringar av Robert Loebel hittar ni på http://www.robertloebel.com/

 

Say hello to the era of social business

post-1-siembraviva-768x373In our brand new report, The Social Business Era: Creating Impact and Influencing Change, we explore a new model for 2017 and beyond: The Social Business. This is a new type of company on the market that is out to challenge traditional ways of doing businesses.

The majority of companies operating today use profit as their main measurement, i.e. the business is judged by others (the market) with economic figures and the potential for growth. But things are changing.

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It is no coincidence that social businesses have recently emerged and developed in the Networked Society. But why is this happening now?

  1. The ultra-capitalistic industrial society of the late 20th Century is now being questioned as a relevant model for a ‘good world’. At the same time, the state and traditional social institutions that are supposed to care for the welfare of citizens are failing people across the world.
  2. New generations growing up with mobility, broadband, and internet access are now entering the arena of social issues. They are also used to things moving quickly, getting things done right away, and seeing direct impact. They experience frustration with old ways of doing things and the slowness and inefficiencies of institutions to accomplish any real change.
  3. The necessary technology is already in place. Today, we have technology platforms, digital tools, and social networks available for free or at a low cost, which makes it possible for people to start something without the need for large investments or technological skills.

How do we define The Social Business?

  1. No dividends allowed. “A non-dividend company that is created to address and solve a social problem”.
  2. Focus on intent and output: “An organization formed by one or more people whose commercial activities are primarily driven by the desire to create positive social change”.
  3. A broad, pragmatic approach: “A business whose primary intent is to create social impact and that uses revenue streams to become financially sustainable in order to further that impact”.

Create positive impact…who wouldn’t want to do that?

In my next post for the Networked Society blog, I will take a look at the main differences between traditional and social businesses.

Read more about this report at Ericsson Networked Society site

Related: The Social Business Era: Creating Impact and Influencing Change

 

Are we shaping smartphones or are they shaping us?

In my last post, I wrote about two-way flexibility – about people trying to understand the new norms and rules in the changing landscape of work and leisure. In this post, I want to continue that discussion further and look into what issues arise as the private and personal spheres merge.

In his book from 1963, ‘Understanding Media’, Marshall McLuhan wrote the following: “For the message of any medium or technology is the change of scale or pace or pattern that it introduces into human affair”. He continues, “The medium is the message, because it is the medium that shape and control the scale and form of human associations and action.” 

What is the message from a smartphone and what pattern does it introduce into human affairs? That is the content of this blog post. Continue to the Networked Society Blog.

When are you out-of-office?

Right now I am sitting at the co-working space, Impact Hub in downtown Seattle preparing for a workshop I will lead tomorrow. I could of course have stayed in my hotel room but I prefer to get a flavor of the local entrepreneurial scene and be a bit social as well (beyond the borders of my computer).

My first business trip with Ericsson was in 1999 to Pittsburgh and the CHI 99 (Computer Human Interaction) conference. Back then you did not really have any connection with work or family when you were traveling. Mobile phones and the internet both existed, but were far from the experience we have today.

A modem was the most common connection until 2005 and intercontinental calls with your mobile phone were not really practical because of the cost. I don’t think I took my laptop with me as it was pretty useless without a connection. So when the conference program was over you did not have any e-mail to answer or work to keep up with. There was a clear border that ended work, defined by the technically and economically limitations.

Today those borders are gone. Wherever you are, work can be there. Continue reading at the Networked Society blog.

It’s working life, Jim, but not as we know it

I have been writing recently about the changes happening in working life and the challenges that both employers and employees will face going forward into the Networked Society.

Today’s cultural changes and technological progress are transforming working life as we know it, creating a business landscape that is dynamic and changing.

The new business landscape emerging out of these changes is a challenging one, where there are no safe positions and where anyone can be overtaken or disqualified. In this harsh new world, you have to learn to adapt to the new rules in order to survive.

What do you as an employer, manager and leader have to think about and consider in this new working environment?
How should you as an individual or employee think? What will be important going forward?
Visit the Networked Society blog and check out some survival tips and advice in a new report, “The Next Generation Working Life – A Survival Guide.”

What is defining next-generation working life?

Recently, Tonny Uhlin and I went into the studio to record the first episode of the “Next-generation Working Life” podcast. During this first episode, we talk about the big and small changes we see coming to our work places as we journey deeper into the Networked Society and how these will impact our working life going forward.

Visit the Networked Society blog and listen to the podcast , or if you like, watch the video above and then read the full report: ‘Next-generation working life – from workplace to exchange space’.

Central sites or local hubs – reflections on future city offices

As mobile technologies continue to liberate us from specific locations and time restrictions, it becomes less important where, when and how work is done. This ultimately will change how people moving around in cities. Some will work from home,others will go to the office and still others may prefer to sit at a café. Telecommuting and distance working will increase but this does not mean that people will only work from their homes (although some will). We still need a social context to our day and this means that we will want to meet people and get stimulated.

Read the full post at the Networked Society blog >>>

The office is dead – long live the exchange place!

The office space is changing and I don’t thing we understand the impact of that change. It will change how we organize work. I have a new post on the topic at the Networked Society blog >>>

It’s work, but not as we know it

Every era has historically had a main area of work or value-creating activity. Most of us think about employment and occupations as something that emerged with industrial society. During the era of “hunting and gathering,” the family, group and community were engaged in all things required in order to survive and have a decent life. These activities involved hunting, gathering food, making fire, creating clothing and so on.

As we started to cultivate the soil and grow crops, the first settlements emerged. For thousands of years, work for most of the Earth’s population involved farming-related activities associated with the season, the sun and the weather. It was hard to differentiate between what was work and what wasn’t because working hours did not exist. During the feudalist era, farmers worked about 120-150 days a year, even if some of the days could be long during harvest time.

Read the rest of the article at The Networked Society blog >>>

 

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