When our ancestors exchanged farm life in favor of factory life in the shift from an agricultural world to an industrial world, life changed fundamentally for hundreds of millions of people. The very basic logic of life shifted for this new working class, with new concepts such as defined working hours, indoor work and a synchronized start and end of the day regardless what weather or season.

The startups and disruptors of that time took advantage of a number of new building blocks that soon became the foundation for organizing commerce and production.

The most important of these building blocks included capital, factories, machines and raw material, and these helped to create the new industries that produced all the things the growing consuming classes demanded. As we now once again are in an era of transformation, this is all changing.

Aaron Dignan from Undercurrent put it like this in the Networked Society Lab report Digital Disruptors:

If you’ve got a 500 million dollar factory on your balance sheet – is that an asset? It’s actually a huge liability, because you have to make stuff with that factory. So I think we move to sort of a more amorphous or ephemeral asset model, and you move up the things that help you innovate rather than produce.

Read the rest of the post att the Networked Society blog