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Mikael Eriksson Björling

Things that matters! About digital transformation, design, culture and lifestyle in the Networked Society

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ConsumerLab

Converging Technology – Diverging Families

ESOMAR10 Year ago, we (Fredrik Öhrfelt, Mikael E Björling, Erik Kruse) submitted a paper “Converging Technology – Diverging Families” to ESOMAR. The paper was nominated to the ESOMAR award ”best research paper of the year”. The research we did 2006 was about technology usage in middleclass families in US, Sweden, and Spain. Well, is an understatement a lot of water has passed the bridge since this research was performed. This was pre- iPhone and Mobile Broadband, but interestingly many questions related to children’s usage is still the same today.

2006 not everything was published online, therefore I publish this paper again as it looked when it was printed in Resarch World.

Converging Technology – Diverging families (OhrfeltBjorlingKruse)

 

When it comes to smartphones, we’re all different

It’s no longer just the early adopters who are driving the growth of smartphone and mobile internet usage. Now we’re all doing it!

More and more people around the world have smartphones and we are expanding the way we use them – from keeping track of our health to being on top of our social life, for shopping or watching Game of Thrones. We have all different preferences and it is becoming increasingly important to understand the factors that affect the overall smartphone experience.

We have been looking recently at what is important to users when it comes to their smartphones and the way they use them. The four key factors are performance, price, interaction with the operator and the device itself. However the importance of these factors varies for different users. Price might be of greater importance for me while the device might be the top factor for you.

In our report Unlocking Consumer Value, we have identified six different groups: the Performance Seekers, the Cost Cutters, the Curious Novices, the Control Seekers, the VIPs and the Devicers.

Read more at the Networked Soceity blog >>>

Unga vill ha ett privatliv på jobbet

Intervju med mig i Computer Sweden om ” Unga vill ha ett privatliv på jobbet”

länk-illu

http://computersweden.idg.se/2.2683/1.506450/unga-vill-ha-ett-privatliv-pa-jobbet

ATEA Boot Camp 2013

BootCamp24 maj var jag och talade på ATEA Boot Camp i Tylösand. Kul och inspirerande!

Här är en intervju med mig på plats i ATEA:s studio.

Mikael Eriksson Björling, expert consumer behavior, Ericsson from Atea Sverige on Vimeo.

Föreläsning på ATEA Boot Camp

ATEA

I slutet på maj kommer jag föreläsa på temat “Nätverksamhället – om uppkopplade individer och en förändrad värld” Vilka är trenderna som formar det framväxande nätverkssamhället? Hur kommer företag och organisationer påverkas? Vilka möjligheter erbjuder det nya nätverkssamhället?

Cloud content extends device life

You might love your devices, your smartphone, tablet, TV or laptop. But it’s no longer the love to the device itself that is that strongest love. As the services we are using become networked, the cloud becomes our love.

Services used to be implemented locally in the mobile phone and phones used to contain a fixed, limited, number of services and functions. The main driver to purchase a new mobile phone used to be that the new model contained a couple of new functions, such as the possibility to send images or play a game. Often the design was dramatically changed between models. The size of the screen, the size of the device, the form factor, i.e. if it was a “bar”, “slider”, “flip” or “swivel” phone. Also the input method differed between models. Most common was the 12-key keypad, but some high-end phones used qwerty keyboard or a stylus pen.

New devices are always attractive, especially in certain customer segments. But for many of us the device we love and utilize every day has become just a screen; that blank surface we touch to start services, to download applications, to update an app or the OS. With a simple touch on the screen we enter the cloud and a world of services. And that is what we love. Read the rest of the post at the Networked Society blog

Is bigger always better? Evolving TV and video-consumption habits

The way we watch TV is evolving continuously. About 10 years ago, it was all about the size of your TV screen at home. While the bigger the better still applies in the living room, in the past two or three years, mobile broadband  and the cloud have enabled TV content to be viewed on smaller devices such as the smartphone or tablet.

The question is, can you really enjoy the content in the same way on such a tiny screen? Apparently. The latest TV and video ConsumerLab report found that mobile devices are an important part of the TV experience, with 67 percent using tablets, smartphones or laptops for their everyday TV viewing.

For me, however, I think it depends on what you watch. If you’re watching a news snippet or reacting to TV on social-media sites, it’s great.  If your commute allows you to get a whole episode of your favorite show in, I think it’s OK too. But if you have to watch snippets of your favorite show over the course of several days, it can completely destroy the viewing experience.

Read the full post at the Networked Society blog >>>

Social life of the young – same needs, different tools

When I was young, dating – or at least trying to date – consisted of slipping a note into a girl’s locker, or shuffling nervously towards her to ask her out with my friends offering humiliating support in the background.

Today it’s much simpler. Ericsson’s ConsumerLab report, Social Life of the Young, looks into how US teenagers are using technology in their social lives. What it shows is that a few text messages can test the temperature of a girl’s interest without you having to suffer the humiliation of your friends’ encouragement. Texting also allows you to communicate with your circle of friends during class or in the privacy of your family home.

Back in the day, walking around school holding your girlfriend’s hand was proof that the relationship was “official.” In today’s technology-driven society, and with Facebook being the highlight of a teenager’s online life, changing your status to “in a relationship” is now seen as the official announcement to your friends.

Read the full post at the Networked Society blog >>>

Socializing leads to satisfaction

In my previous post, I wrote that commuting is the biggest source of stress and frustration for people living in cities, according to a new Ericsson ConsumerLab report, City Life.

So what makes city residents feel at ease? Social networking. Those who live in the city spend a large chunk of their time socializing. On average, a city dweller spends two hours and 30 minutes socializing a day, with about 45 of these minutes spent online. This is much more than people who live elsewhere. They also have many more online friends, accessing online social networks as much as three to five times a day. Read the full post at the Networked Society blog >>>

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